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Availability for October 8


Hello there! It’s already nearly 11pm as I sit down to write this, so once again I’m going to skip the photos and recipes and skip straight to the availability list. Well, after a few announcements…

Yesterday we held our third annual “Hunter’s Moon Feast” out at my place, and it was our best one yet, I think. A good number of people came out to spend the day with us, and even more came to watch the moon rise over the river. Several tents went up on the riverbank for what turned out to be an excellent night for camping. Thank you everyone for coming out and sharing your food with the rest of us. I hope even more of you can come out to join us next year!

The state has given us a deadline for leaving the old market building: we have at the very latest until early December, and might have to be out even sooner, in early November. I’ll be looking at various alternative sites that have been offered to us over the next few days. Truth is, though, that none of them so far are as ideal as our current location, which was originally built for exactly what we’re using it for. I’ll be searching quickly for something that will work with the least disruption for you, the growers, and the market workers. It’s a tall order, and I’ll keep you well informed.

One of the canonical examples of the dangers of the industrial food system is the good old hamburger. A single hamburger patty can have meat from dozens of animals from cows from around the world, all in the effort to shave a few cents of the cost of producing that patty. The New York Times today had an eye-opening article on the problems of manufacturing food this way that does as good a job of making the case for knowing your farmers than anything else I’ve seen. You can read it yourself here: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/health/04meat.html.

Finally, FOLK is holding their second annual Apple Festival next weekend. I missed it last year, and will have to again this year, but I’ve heard it’s a wonderful family-friendly event. I received this from one of the organizers: "FOLK’s second annual Fall Apple Festival… FOLK (Furthering Our Local Knowledge) is a local nonprofit organization dedicated to reviving traditional forms of understanding and doing things (www.folkathens.org, if you’d like to know more about us). Our apple festival will be held from 1 to 8 on October 17th this year, and we’re trying to bring out more farmers and local artists this year; last year we had 500-700 people, and we’re expecting it to be just as big, if not bigger (depending on weather) this year."

Thanks as always for all of your support of local food, local farmers, and Athens Locally Grown!

Availability for October 1


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Sweet Potato, Broccoli, and Tomato Stew

Make this tasty, one-pot vegetable stew and you’ll have dinner on the table in no time and with little mess. Put your kids or even your dog on this simple project and go relax—dinner will be served within the hour no matter what. This stew will go well with your favorite corn bread. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, sliced
4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 28-ounce can stewed tomatoes
2 cups cooked or canned garbanzo beans, drained
1 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable stock or water
3 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), cubed
1 medium head broccoli, cut into large chunks (about 2 cups)
salt
freshly ground black pepper

1. Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion; cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 more minute.
2. Add the tomatoes, garbanzo beans, stock, and sweet potatoes. Simmer, partially covered, for 15 minutes. Add the broccoli, cover, and simmer until the sweet potatoes and broccoli are tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Market News

I think some of our farms have seen more rain in the past two weeks than we’ve seen in some entire recent summers. I’ve heard a few stories of freshly seeded beds getting washed out and collard plants entirely underwater, but all in all, most of our growers came through these rains with little damage. I think the late snowfall we had this spring did more damage, really, collapsing hoophouses and pulling down trees on several farms.

A bit further west, in Carrolton, one of the oldest organic farms in the state became a river bottom for several days. The farm is currently known as “Love is Love Farm” and is operated by Judith Winfrey (the leader of Slow Food Atlanta) and Joe Reynolds, but for over thirty years it was known as the Glover Family Farm, the home of Skip & Cookie Glover. If you’re on Facebook, you can see photos of the flood and its aftermath here: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Douglasville-GA/Love-is-Love-Farm/14079829974. We wish them a speedy recovery, but I’ve got to say those pictures look devastating. Farmers used to rely on the annual floods to replenish the fields, but late summer?





The rains and cloudy skies have slowed down the growth of the leafy greens we’re all waiting on. The love the cool nights that are here again, but they love the autumn sun even more ,and we just haven’t seen much of that lately. Soon! Until then, feast on the waning crops of peppers, tomatoes, and eggplant. If you’re able, freeze or can some to pull out in February when you’re absolutely craving a ripe tomato or some fried onions & potatoes. And don’t miss out on the winter squash which are now in abundance. Those store well, too, and our growers have some heirloom varieties that are just dynamite in flavor. Certainly unlike anything you can find at the grocery store!

One last reminder: the Georgia Organics “Field of Greens” party is coming up at Whippoorwill Hollow Farm right down the road from Athens in Walnut Grove. This year’s event is shaping up to be the best ever. Participating restaurants, who will be providing free tastings to participants include Rosebud, Leon’s, 5 Seasons, Retaurant Eugene,Woodfire Grill, Parish, Rathbun’s, Valencia, Food 101, 4th & Swift, farm 255, Living Foods Institute — with more pending. A new event this year, the heritage pork cookoff pits Ron Eyester of Rosebud, Dave Larkworthy of 5 Seasons Brewing, and Kevin Gillespie of Woodfire Grill, working with heritage pork raised by three different farms. They’ll also have an organic market onsite where attendees can learn about sustainable living options, and purchase farm products, from 50 vendors. The event is being held on October 4 from 11am – 6pm. Yes, that’s the day after Athens Locally Grown’s “Hunter’s Moon Feast” at my farm, but what better way to spend a weekend? You can find more info about Field of Greens at their special website, http://www.fieldofgreensfestival.com/

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

We still have one more event on the schedule, up at my place: our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast this coming Saturday, October 3rd. Spaces are limited, so be sure to make your free reservations along with your order! Take a look in the “Event Reservations” category for full details on this event.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Several of our growers also sell at the Hocshton
farmers market, also on Saturday mornings. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for September 24


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Chile Rellenos With Lamb

These traditional New Mexican stuffed chiles are unlike any chile rellenos you’ll find in a Mexican restaurant around Athens. They’re much, much better! These are one of my favorite foods, and were a payday treat when I lived as a frugal student in Socorro, New Mexico.

Serves 4

1 lb ground lamb
1 onion, finely diced
1/2 cup carrots, finely diced
4 eggs
3/4 t baking powder
4 T flour
1/4 t salt
12 whole peeled poblano chiles
1/2 lb shredded Mexican cheeses
oil for frying

1. To peel chiles, heat under a broiler until skin is blistered, turning several times. Place together in a paper bag for a few minutes to steam. The skins will peel right off.
2. Brown lamb, onion, and carrot together. Salt & pepper well. Add some fresh herbs of your choice if you have some at hand. Set aside.
3. Beat eggs until foamy, add baking powder, flour, salt. Set aside.
4. Mix cheese together with lamb mixture.
5. Slit each pepper lengthwise, add lamb & cheese mixture.
6. Dip in batter and fry until golden brown.

Market News

Last week, I told you about several upcoming conferences and events coming up in the next few months. Turns out there’s one organization I’d only vaguely heard of that’s having a great event just next weekend. The Georgia Mountains Foodways Alliance is an organization dedicated to “supporting local foodways through education, outreach and sharing delicious food”. That is to say, they’re a group that suppors exactly the same things we do right here at Athens Locally Grown with the added bonus that their events give you another excuse to go spend a day in the mountains of North Georgia.

Here are the details for their 2nd annual Grow, Cook, Eat: A Mountain Harvest Celebration Saturday, September 26 2009 in Clayton, Georgia, off their website, http://www.georgiafoodways.org :

Regional farmers and other producers of local foodstuffs will collaborate with chefs from area restaurants to create a cornucopia of dishes featuring the season’s freshest ingredients. This community event celebrates locally grown foods and encourages everyone to choose foods produced within 100 miles of where you live for better flavor, more seasonal variety, and to reduce the negative environmental impact of transporting and packaging food for thousands of miles. And best of all, when you purchase locally grown and produced foodstuffs, more of your money stays in your community and supports your neighbors.

Local ingredients to be featured in gourmet dishes at this year’s celebration include corn, summer and winter squash, cabbage, tomatoes, greens, chutney, jam, jelly, honey, goat cheese, fish, aromatic herbs and much more. Many ingredients to be used are from certified organic and sustainable farms. Several local wineries will be pouring prize-winning Georgia wines, and local cider will be served. Live toe-tapping music will be provided by the popular duo, “Mountain Hoodoo,” from 12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m. A farmer’s market offering local produce will also featured.

Local businesses participating in the celebration include the Barn Inn, Beechwood Inn, BotanoLogos School for Herbal Studies, Coleman River Farms, Crescent Moon Bakery, David Taylor Farm, Green to Bean Coffee Roasters, Glen Ella Springs Inn, Grapes and Beans, La Gracia Farm, Lake Rabun Hotel, Persimmon Creek Vineyards, Sylvan Falls Mill Bed and Breakfast, The Vines Restaurant at Edelweiss German Inn, Tallulah Grill, Tiger Mountain Vineyards, Yati’s and many others.

This year’s event will be held at the Center on Warwoman, 2368 Pinnacle Drive, (corner of Warwoman Road and Pinnacle Drive) in Clayton, Georgia on Saturday, September 26th from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tickets are $20.00 each for adults, children under 12 years admitted free. Tickets go on sale August 1st. All tickets must be purchased in advance and no tickets will be available the day of the event.

Tickets are available in Rabun County and in Helen. Ticket locations in Rabun County include the Simply Homegrown Market, Rabun County Visitor’s Center, Butler’s I & II, and Persimmon Creek Winery Tasting Room, and in Helen at the Vines at Edelweiss German Inn. For more information call (706) 782-5485 or e-mail info@georgiafoodways.org.





One food note this week: Black Cow Coffeehouse has gotten out of the baking business altogether. I know this is sad news for those of you who were regular purchasers of their cookies and sweet rolls. Fred’s Bread is on vacation, but is expected to return soon. Fred & Black Cow shared the same kitchen, so I’m sure there is some arrangements being made regarding that.

Just a reminder: the Georgia Organics “Field of Greens” party is coming up at Whippoorwill Hollow Farm right down the road from Athens in Walnut Grove. This year’s event is shaping up to be the best ever. Participating restaurants, who will be providing free tastings to participants include Rosebud, Leon’s, 5 Seasons, Retaurant Eugene,Woodfire Grill, Parish, Rathbun’s, Valencia, Food 101, 4th & Swift, farm 255, Living Foods Institute — with more pending. A new event this year, the heritage pork cookoff pits Ron Eyester of Rosebud, Dave Larkworthy of 5 Seasons Brewing, and Kevin Gillespie of Woodfire Grill, working with heritage pork raised by three different farms. They’ll also have an organic market onsite where attendees can learn about sustainable living options, and purchase farm products, from 50 vendors. The event is being held on October 4 from 11am – 6pm. Yes, that’s the day after Athens Locally Grown’s “Hunter’s Moon Feast” at my farm, but what better way to spend a weekend? You can find more info about Field of Greens at their special website, http://www.fieldofgreensfestival.com/

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

We still have one more event on the schedule, up at my place: our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces are limited, so be sure to make your free reservations along with your order! Take a look in the “Event Reservations” category for full details on this event.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Several of our growers also sell at the Hocshton
farmers market, also on Saturday mornings. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for September 17


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Spicy Onions and Bell Peppers in Yogurt Sauce over Corn Bread

The key to the creamy sauce in this recipe is yogurt. Whole-grain bread works well in place of the corn bread and that nondairy yogurt can be substituted. The sauce also goes well with curried basmati rice. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

Serves 4

1 loaf corn bread
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or butter
2 cups thinly sliced onion (about 3 medium onions)
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 medium bell peppers, stems and seeds removed, thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
freshly ground black pepper
cayenne pepper (or less, to taste)
3 cloves garlic, minced (about 1 1/2 teaspoons)
1/2–3/4 cup yogurt

1. Set the oven to its warm setting or preheat it to 200° F. Wrap the corn bread in aluminum foil and place it in the oven to warm.
2. Heat the oil or butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and salt; cook, stirring frequently, until the onion is very soft and just beginning to brown, 10 to 15 minutes.
3. Add the bell peppers, cumin, and black pepper and cayenne to taste. Cook until the bell peppers are tender, about 10 minutes. Add the chopped garlic and cook until fragrant, 1 minute more.
4. Remove the skillet from heat. Stir in 1/2 cup of the yogurt. If you would like a creamier sauce, add the rest of the yogurt.
5. Tear the warm bread into chunks and place it on individual plates. Spoon the onion sauce over the bread. Serve immediately.

Market News

Winter is generally the time that farmers get together and talk about the previous year, sharing secrets about what worked and warnings about what did not. Industrial farming might be more like top secret laboratories, where only those with special clearance can get inside and the products are controlled more by lawyers than food makers, but sustainable farmers are by and large a whole different breed. We share and share alike, and get together during the off season to spread the knowledge around.

Two of the largest such gatherings in our area is the Georgia Organics conference and the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (SSAWG) conference. Both attract over 1000 growers and others interested in sustainable food production, and both are in the processes of getting planned.

The Georgia Organics conference will be held right here in Athens, from February 19th to the 21st. The site planning committee met last week over lunch at Farm 255, and I’m certain you’ll want to be a part of conference. Indeed, you are one of the reasons why GO was attracted to Athens. We’ve earned a reputation for being a city with a thriving local food culture, and many towns across the country look to us as a model. Above all else, it’s your continuing commitment to eating local sustainably grown foods that has led to more growers, more variety, and more people interested in the same. Thank you!

The SSAWG conference will be held in Chattanooga from January 20th through 24th. I’m on the staff there, and it’s already shaping up to be another can’t miss event. I’ll have more details on both as they get closer, and let you know when registrations are open.

Another nice area conference is the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association’s annual get-together. This year it’s being held in Black Mountain, NC, from December 4th through 6th. You can find more information about that at their website: http://www.carolinafarmstewards.org/SAC09.shtml.

And speaking of Georgia Organics, one of their most looked-forward to events is their “Field of Greens” party, held every year at Whippoorwill Hollow Farm right down the road from Athens in Walnut Grove. This year’s event is shaping up to be the best ever. Participating restaurants, who will be providing free tastings to participants include Rosebud, Leon’s, 5 Seasons, Retaurant Eugene,Woodfire Grill, Parish, Rathbun’s, Valencia, Food 101, 4th & Swift, farm 255, Living Foods Institute — with more pending. A new event this year, the heritage pork cookoff pits Ron Eyester of Rosebud, Dave Larkworthy of 5 Seasons Brewing, and Kevin Gillespie of Woodfire Grill, working with heritage pork raised by three different farms. They’ll also have an organic market onsite where attendees can learn about sustainable living options, and purchase farm products, from 50 vendors. The event is being held on October 4 from 11am – 6pm. Yes, that’s the day after Athens Locally Grown’s “Hunter’s Moon Feast” at my farm, but what better way to spend a weekend? You can find more info about Field of Greens at their special website, http://www.fieldofgreensfestival.com/

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

We still have one more event on the schedule, up at my place: our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces are limited, so be sure to make your free reservations along with your order! Take a look in the “Event Reservations” category for full details on this event.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Several of our growers also sell at the Hocshton
farmers market, also on Saturday mornings. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for September 10


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Baba Ghanouj

This is a traditional Middle Eastern recipe for baba ghanouj, a thick but light spread that is delicious as a dip for pita bread or vegetables or as a filling in a sandwich. Its distinct, nutty flavor comes from tahini, a
sesame paste that is widely available in specialty stores and many supermarkets. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

Serves 4

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
2 medium eggplants (about 1 1/2 pounds)
1/4 cup pine nuts
1/4–1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (1–1 1/2 large lemons)
1/3 cup tahini
1–2 cloves garlic, minced (1/2–1 teaspoon)
1 teaspoon ground cumin (optional)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or parsley

1. Preheat the oven to 375° F.
2. Rub 1 tablespoon of the oil over both whole eggplants and place them on a baking sheet. Roast, turning once or twice, until very soft, 30 to 45 minutes depending on size. Let cool.
3. Meanwhile, toast the pine nuts in a dry, heavy skillet (preferably cast iron) over high heat until they start to brown in spots and become fragrant. (Be careful not to overtoast them, as they will burn very quickly once toasted.) Immediately transfer the nuts to a dish to cool.
4. Cut the eggplants in half and scoop out the flesh. Purée the eggplant flesh in a food processor or finely chop it on a cutting board. Transfer to a bowl.
5. Add the lemon juice, tahini, garlic, cumin, salt, cayenne, and the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Mix until well combined.
6. Transfer to a serving bowl and garnish with cilantro or parsley and toasted pine nuts.

Market News

First off, let me thank you all for spreading yourselves out last week. We went from filling half the orders in the first 45 minutes to steady traffic throughout the entire three and a half hour window. You all couldn’t have done it any better if you’d signed up for specific five minute intervals, and Thursday ran more smoothly than it had in years. Thank you!

This past week, one of our members found a contest being sponsored by NBC and American Express, where they are trying to recognize an inspiring small business by giving it $100,000 in grants and support. It’s called “Shine a Light”, and here’s what they have to say:

Everyday small business are leading our country and their local communities to a new and better way of working and thinking. Through good times and bad, their resilience and entrepreneurial spirit can serve as an inspiration to us all. That’s why American Express, in partnership with NBC Universal, is inviting you to “shine a light” on a small business that you find inspiring. Has this business adopted an innovative approach to surviving tough times? Does it believe in a customer-first mentality? Does it give back to the community? We want to hear the story – in your words. Three Finalists will be selected by judges and one Winner will be selected from the three Finalists through user voting.

After a business gets nominated, it needs fifty people to register with the site and endorse the nomination. So, Athens Locally Grown was nominated, and just through word of mouth over the last few days, we’ve already received the fifty endorsements needed to get us in front of the judges. You can see the nomination here. And even though we’ve received the minimum number, I think it’d really help our odds and impress the judges if we had a lot more. It turns out the leader right now has 878, and the tenth place has only 328. This email is going out to about 2000 people, and if only a third of you also gave your endorsement, we’d be in a solid second. That’s feasible, isn’t it? And a lot of times contests like this just seem like another lottery with long odds, but I really think we’ve got a great shot at this one. They seem to be looking for groups just like us! If you’d like to endorse our nomination, you’ll first need to create an account here, and then click on the “Endorse Now” button on our nomination. The whole process should take less than five minutes. Nominations close on Saturday the 13th, so we have only this week to make an impression. I think we can do this!

Finally, every year I get questions about classes for beginning gardeners or for those who want to better expand their existing garden. Well, this Fall the Athens Area Master Gardener Association, Clarke County Cooperative Extension and Athens Tech are teaming up to provide a series of classes on vegetable gardening. There are 9 classes total with a different topic each night. Classes are Thursday nights beginning September 17th through November 12th and will be from 6:00-7:30pm at the Athens Tech campus. Each class is $15 each or you can register for the series at a reduced rate of $99. Topics include: Soils and Amending, Composting and Mulching, Starting seeds and transplants and seed saving, Spring gardening, Harvesting and Irrigation, Small Fruits, Winter gardening, Insects, diseases and weeds, and Preserving the harvest. To schedule classes, simply call Athens Technical College at 706-369-5763, or register online at athenstech.edu.

Without further ado, it’s time to get on to the food. There are a number of great heirloom varieties of peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, winter squash, sweet potatoes, and other things available this week, so you’ve got a great opportunity to experiment a little bit and try something that’s both rare and delicious.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Our last Farmer for a Day event just happened this past Saturday over at the Johnston Family Farm where we saw their dairy (and sampled some of that delicious chocolate milk, right off the tap). We still have one more event on the schedule at my place: our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces are limited, so be sure to make your free reservations along with your order!

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Several of our growers also sell at the Hocshton
farmers market, also on Saturday mornings. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Market Open for September 3


Just this once I’m going to skip the product listing and fancy formatting, just to better the odds the following announcements make it through everyone’s junk mail filters.

First, the last several weeks, my weekly email has been classified as “spam” by Google, and so for pretty much everyone using Gmail (and possibly a few other services that use Google’s filters), my email hasn’t been making it into their inbox. To keep that from happening, create a filter on my email address, “eric@locallygrown.net”, that sends it to the inbox or otherwise keeps it out of your junk mail system. Also, if you’re in doubt, you can find a copy of the email on the website itself (minus the full product listing) on the Weblog page. And, whether you get the email or not, the website is always open before I go to bed Sunday night.

Second, we open the market for pickups on Thursday at 4:30pm, and we’re there until 8pm. Items that run short are filled in the order the orders are placed, not in the order you arrive to pick them up, so you don’t gain anything by arriving early. We’re starting to get a sizable line at 4pm, and what’s worse, there have been several people who have been impatient with us when we can’t fill their orders right then, despite us not even being open yet. If the growers arrive early and we’re able to start filling orders early, we will, but otherwise, no.

Last week we filled about half of all the orders for the week (and we had a record number of orders) by 5:15, and the entire rest of the night, there was no line whatsoever. If you’re able to arrive after 5:30, please consider doing so. You’ll avoid the rush and make the process smoother for everyone involved.

Finally, the state probation office, located right behind the market building, is beginning to page a new parking lot. It’s unfortunately part of the process of putting the building up for sale. It’s also going to tie up the area behind the building with heavy equipment and piles of dirt. If you’ve been coming in the back gate, you’re probably going to have to come in the front. Also, our growers are going to have to unload in the front, making things even tighter for those early in the afternoon. Hopefully it won’t be too bad, but considering they were going to use the entire facility for staging until Amanda Tedrow, ACC’s wonderful Ag Extension Agent, interceded on our behalf. Thanks, Amanda!

And now, on to the food…

Availability for August 27


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Broiled Eggplant with Crunchy Parmesan Crust

This is such an easy way to make a crunchy-crusted eggplant appetizer that you may even feel guilty about the raves it receives. Recipe-tester Barbara suggests topping this dish with tomato sauce. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

oil for greasing the baking sheet
mayonnaise
eggplant, cut into 1/4-inch slices
freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 1/2 cup)

1. Preheat the broiler. Lightly oil a baking sheet.
2. Spread mayonnaise sparingly on both sides of each eggplant slice, then dip the slices in the grated Parmesan cheese, thoroughly coating both sides.
3. Arrange the slices in a single layer on the oiled baking sheet and place under the broiler until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Flip the slices and broil until golden brown and crunchy on top and the eggplant is soft, about 3 minutes more.

Market News

Many of you have asked me about the documentary Food, Inc., recently released at theaters scattered throughout the country. It’s finally made its way to Athens, showing three times every day this week at Cine downtown. Tuesday evening, local organizations Ecofocus and P.L.A.C.E. present a special screening of Food, Inc. followed by a panel discussion with UGA professors Hilda Kurtz (Geography) and Shane Hamilton (History) (both fellow ALG members). Prior to the screening, audiences can enjoy a coffee & dessert reception sponsored by Farm255 and 1000Faces Coffee. The reception on Tuesday starts at 7pm with the screening to follow at 7:30pm. As Athens Locally Grown customers, you already know the importance of knowing where your food comes from, but hopefully you’ll get a chance to come out and see how Director Robert Kenner and Michael Pollan lay it all out.

The mornings are getting cool and the days are getting shorter, reminding us that fall will soon be here. The growers have been laying out seedlings for cabbage, kale, broccoli, and lettuce, and planting seeds for carrots, turnips, radishes, and other root veggies. If they can keep them nourished through the next four weeks or so of heat, we’ll all soon be treated to the fruits of their labor. Fall is an often overlooked gardening season, but it’s come to be my favorite. If you’ve got a garden, you may be tempted to rip it all out as summer comes to an end, but resist! Pretty much everything you can grow in the spring you can also grow in the fall, and much of the time here, they’ll grow even better this time of year.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Our next Farmer for a Day event is coming up on September 5th. Most of the slots are filled, but look in the “Events Reservations” category to claim the last few slots. We’ll be heading over to the Johnston Family Farm to see their dairy (and sample some of that delicious chocolate milk, right off the tap). We’ll then wind up the season at my place for our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces for all are limited, so be sure to make your reservations along with your order!

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for August 20


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Sweet Potato Pancakes

Serve these for breakfast or as a side dish. Small, even tiny, pancakes, topped with spicy pineapple salsa or something creative of your choosing, make ideal hors d’oeuvres. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

Makes about twenty 3 1/2- to 4-inch pancakes

6 medium sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds), peeled and grated
1 medium red onion, thinly sliced or finely chopped
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 large eggs, lightly beaten
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup vegetable oil

1. Combine the sweet potatoes and onion in a large bowl. Add the flour, eggs, and olive oil; mix well. Stir in the milk, salt, and pepper.
2. Heat the vegetable oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Test the heat by dropping a small amount of batter in the pan— if the oil immediately bubbles up around the batter, it has reached the proper temperature. Be careful not to let the oil overheat and smoke.
3. Using a ladle, 1/2 cup measuring cup, or large spoon, drop the pancake batter into the hot oil and then lightly press it into a pancake shape with a spatula. Cook until pancakes are golden brown on the bottom, about 5 minutes, then flip them and cook until brown on the other side, 5 minutes. Remove pancakes and drain on paper towels. Serve immediately or keep them warm in the oven.

Market News

I’m sure I’d wanted to write a nice long letter to you all this week, but I can’t for the life of me remember what I wanted to say. You see, my daughter had her first full week of kindergarten last week, and adjusting to the new household schedule has just been exhausting. I’d though the life of a farmer was tiring, but making sure the young’un gets on the bus at 6:55 seems to be more tiring still. I’ll adjust, I’m sure, but most nights I seem to wish that I had the same bedtime as her.

One thing I definitely wanted to mention is a yearly occurrence that always seems to catch people by surprise. I’m talking about the sudden drop in available produce in late August that just seems to come out of nowhere. You see, most years, the last two weeks of August are so hot and so humid that most of the traditional summer veggies just can’t bear fruit. They’ll flower as usual, but nothing happens after that. Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, squash… it seems to affect everything. Some years it’s not so bad (last year was one of those), but other years it seems like suddenly there’s nothing but okra to be had. I think that most of our growers have diversified their offerings enough that even in the worst heat there will be plenty of things to go around, but here’s your head’s up: there may not be for a couple weeks. It’s only temporary, and everything always recovers in early September, and keeps producing up until frost (mid-October around here).

We still have two Farmer for a Day events coming up and our annual fall party in October, including a visit to Roots Farm next Saturday. Seats to all three events are limited, so you’ll need to make reservations. Take a look under the “Events Reservations” category and add them along with your order. All three events are free, so you’ll just need to add yourselves to the list.

I’ve been asked a few times recently about the fate of the old state farmers market we’re using for our pickup location. The state has declared it surplus and still intends to sell it at auction. LUckily for us, they are moving exceedingly slow, and we are allowed to use it up until it does get sold. The closed bid auction is a 90 day process, so we should get at least that much notice before we have to leave. I’ve been looking around for other options, and there are a few at this point, but to be honest… none are as good as what we’ve got now. Still, I’m confident we’ll be able to make something work out for most everyone when the time does come.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown, all of our growers, and local food in general. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at the old state market on Broad Street from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Our next Farmer for a Day event, a make-up day for our first tour, rained out at Roots Farm, is coming up on August 22nd. Most of the slots are filled, but look in the “Events Reservations” category to claim the last few slots. In September we’ll head over to the Johnston Family Farm to see their dairy (and sample some of that delicious chocolate milk, right off the tap), and then wind up the season at my place for our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces for all are limited, so be sure to make your reservations along with your order!

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for August 13


To Contact Us

Athens Locally Grown
athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown

Recipes

Roasted Red Pepper Soup

Served hot or cold, this soup is packed with a savory-sweet roasted pepper flavor that might have you skipping the main course and opting for a second bowl of soup instead. It’s preferable to use home-made roasted red bell peppers in this soup. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables

Serves 4 to 6

3 tablespoons butter
1 medium onion, chopped (about 1/2 cup)
1 small potato, quartered
2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced (1 to 11/2 teaspoons)
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon fresh oregano or thyme, or 1/2 tablespoon dried, plus more for garnish
1 tablespoon tomato paste
4 large red bell peppers, roasted, skinned, chopped
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon salt
4 cups vegetable or chicken stock or water
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or more to taste
freshly ground black pepper
salt
freshly grated Parmesan cheese croutons (optional)

1. Melt the butter in a soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, potato, garlic, bay leaf, and herbs; sauté until potato and onion begin to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook for 1 minute. Add the roasted peppers, paprika, and 1 teaspoon salt; cook for 30 seconds.
2. Pour in stock or water and scrape up any of the flavorful caramelized pieces stuck to the bottom of the pot. Bring the soup to a boil, then lower heat to a gentle simmer; cook, partially covered, for 30 minutes.
3. Purée soup in a blender or food processor or run it through a food mill. Return it to the pot and heat until warmed through. Add the balsamic vinegar and a few grindings of fresh black pepper. Taste; add salt if desired.
4. Garnish each serving with some Parmesan, a little fresh herb, and croutons if desired.

Market News

It’s another record setting week at Athens Locally Grown, with 822 items available for you from 53 Athens-area sustainable growers. Thanks to your demand and the untold hours of hard work put in by our growers, we have a diversity of locally grown foods that rivals many large cities. It’s certainly broader than any one market in Atlanta. As many of you know, nearly 100 other communities throughout the country are following on our footsteps, with a handful of customers and a handful of local growers all working hard to get for their own neighborhoods what we’re so lucky to have here. You can see them all on a map, if you’re interested, over at www.locallygrown.net/markets. It’s pretty neat to see them all radiating out from Athens out to the rest of the country.

One of the keys to our success has been the low overhead the market operates. The growers generally keep 90% of the price you see, and the ease they have in bringing products to you lets them bring more things that you’d find at a typical farmers market. The 10% the market keeps goes toward a food allowance for our volunteers, and the tables, cots, coolers, the dairy truck, and the other physical things needed to make the market happen. We don’t advertise, because you all have been doing such a great job telling your friends about us. Don’t be shy about continuing that – I think you have a great thing to brag about!

The fall fruits are starting to come in, so be sure to take a spin down the fruit aisle. We’ve got a number of varieties of apples, lots of heirloom and unusual melons, and the completely unexpectedly wonderful ground cherries. If you were brave enough to try the samples we had at the cash box last week, those things that looked like little tomatillos, you know how great those are. There are also many types of peppers, from giant bells to tiny fiery chiles. And of course the tomato vines are overflowing with tomatoes of all sorts.

So, fill you shopping cart with the finest food our soil has to offer, and then tell your friends about us so they can do the same!

As always, thank you all for your continued support of our local growers and local food. Without your business, the growers wouldn’t be here to supply this diversity, and we’d all be a lot worse off. We’ll see you on Thursday from 4:30 to 8pm at the old market on Broad Street!

Coming Events

Our next Farmer for a Day event, a make-up day for our first tour, rained out at Roots Farm, is coming up on August 22nd. Most of the slots are filled, but look in the “Events Reservations” category to claim the last few slots. In September we’ll head over to the Johnston Family Farm to see their dairy (and sample some of that delicious chocolate milk, right off the tap), and then wind up the season at my place for our annual Hunter’s Moon Feast on October 3rd. Spaces for all are limited, so be sure to make your reservations along with your order!

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, Watkinsville has a thriving farmers market every Saturday morning, behind the Eagle Tavern. And further east, Comer has a nice little market Saturday mornings as well. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Reminder: Athens Locally Grown Pickups Today


Every year when school starts back up, we always have a higher than usual number of no-shows, what with the relaxed schedules of summer switching over to the more hectic back-to-school schedules of fall. So, here’s an extra reminder that today is indeed Thursday, and we’ll be there with your orders.

Also, Nature’s Harmony Farm had a freezer fail overnight, and they’ll be bringing its contents in so you can use it as fresh dog food. It’s yours free for the taking if your pets would like some fresh meat, and they’ll be mostly small packs of liver, kidney, and similar items.

See you there!