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Availability for July 8


Happy Independence Day to everyone out there! Today is the day we celebrate our independence from the tyranny of a king, but it’s also a great occasion to think about our independence from all sorts of things. Your support of Athens Locally Grown greatly helps the cause of food independence for our community, for starters. Did you know that, on average, American farmer receives only nine cents out of every dollar that gets spent on food? By the time you take out the cut of the processors, the distributors, the wholesalers, and so forth, only 9% is left for the farm. And of course, they’ve got to try to meet all of the expenses of running a farm with that money, and pretty much the only way to do that is by consolidating the farmland into huge “corporate” farms that can get by with the economies of scale. The farms might be independent family-owned enterprises on paper, but they’re beholden to all of those other interests that control the other 91% of the food dollar. Here at Athens Locally Grown, the growers keep 90% of every dollar, turning small, truly family owned and operated farms into viable businesses. That fosters variety for you, provides a sustainable use of the area’s green space, and helps in no small way Athens be a more self-reliant community.

For you, too, these growers and their products let you become independent from the corporate grover, who is told by the corporate office in Cincinnati or Bentonville or Greenville what they can and can’t stock and who they can source their produce from. You’re given the freedom to choose who grows and produces your food and how they grow and produce it. If you don’t like one grower’s products or methods, you have a hundred others, all located right here, to choose from.

And of course by sourcing your food so close to home, you don’t have to be reliant on an overtaxed and under-vigilant inspection system to make sure your food is safe. The Federal government is actively trying to reduce your ability to choose where your food comes from, so not everything is rosy. I’m a plaintiff in a Federal law suit against the FDA resulting from the raw milk incident last fall. You may recall that state gents seized milk from our Athens Locally Grown pickup point in October, and then a few days later the state came out to my home and, under the direction of an FDA agent who was present, ordered all of the milk to be destroyed. Last week, in a court filing, the FDA called my affidavit where I recounted the events of that day “bizzare allegations” and denied that the incident ever happened. That may come as a surprise to those of you who came out to my houe that day and witnessed it, but there we are. Our fight for independence is an ongoing one.

I could go on, but this has already gotten long. I’m typing all this on my phone while my wife drives us back from watching fireworks in Greenville, SC. Please excuse any typos; it’s easy to type, but not so easy to proofread.

Speaking of typing on my phone, we tried out an order checkout system on some old iPhones last week. We’ve only found two, but it worked well enough that we’re now looking for more. If you’ve got an old iPhone or iPod touch lying around you don’t need, would you consider donating it to us? With the two iPads we have at the pay table and if each of the six volunteers filling orders had an iPhone or iPod touch, we will save a ream of paper a week. That’s a lot of paper, and it adds up fast. Not only that, but doing everything live on the website has really helped us prevent the errors that we sometimes make filling orders, and at the very least make sure you get a proper refund when we do leave something out. It’s also greatly cut down on the behind-the-scenes work I do keeping all the books in order.

Our next Farmer for a Day event, on Sunday July 11, at Veribest Farm, has just about filled up. There are slots still available for our August, and September Farmer for a Day events, and you can find more details on all of them on the Market page of the website, under the Event Reservations category.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Thank you for all of your support of Athens Locally Grown and our member growers. Without your patronage and demand for locally grown and naturally grown foods, the growers wouldn’t be here to meet that demand, and our entire community would be much worse off. Thank you! We’ll see you on Thursday from 4:30 to 8pm at Ben’s Bikes, at the corner of Pope and Broad!

Availability for July 1


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Tacos de Quelites — Tacos of Garlicky Greens

There are lots of recipes out there for “authentic” Mexican spinach quesadillas and similar dishes out there. Few of them will tell you, however, that none of those dishes were traditionally made with spinach. It’s a cool weather crop that has trouble growing here in Georgia, much less in the more arid and hot climates further south. What does grow well, both here and there, is the even more nutritious Lamb’s Quarter, and this is what modern recipes replace with spinach.

Makes 8 Tacos

8 to 10 corn tortillas
9 cups (about 1 pound) loosely packed, stemmed lambs’ quarters?
1 tablespoon olive oil?
1 medium white onion, sliced 1/4-inch thick?
3 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped?
Salt, about 1/2 teaspoon?
1/4 cup finely crumbled cheese
About 3/4 cup salsa

1. Warm tortillas in steamer, oven, or microwave.
2. Boil greens in salted water until barely tender, about 3 minutes. Drain, cool, and roughly chop.
3. Sear onions in oil until golden brown (about 10 minutes). Add garlic and salt and stir for one minute. Add greens and stir for one minute more. Season to taste.
4. Sprinkle mixture with cheese.
5. Assemble tacos at the table.

Market News

I’ve gone on and on about the variety of produce you can find at Athens Locally Grown. It really is incredible how many types of tomatoes, the arrays of lettuces, the shapes of squash that our growers are able to bring to market each week. And many of them, the heirlooms especially, each have a story, a place of origin, and a specific reason for being grown. Their seeds were passed down from generation to generation for a reason, and we’re very lucky to live in a time where the best varieties from around the world are available to us, their seeds delivered right to your door for planting in your own garden. Civilization has brought us many amazing things, and this one is often overlooked. I’m able to take a bite of an amazing black tomato that was grown for a couple hundred years only in one little community near the Crimean Sea in Russia, and not even bat an eye.

But the foods that have been grown closer to home for even longer often get overlooked too, to the point that many people don’t even know they exist. Take for example the lowly lamb’s quarter, Chenopodium album. For many, it’s a despised weed. It grows quickly in newly disturbed soil, can reach heights of six feet or more, and its seed heads are full of tiny seeds ready to outgrow everything else the next season. Truth is, however, that this was one of the staple foods for North American natives for thousands of years. Its leaves are more highly nutritious than anything else in the garden, even kale. It contains enough vitamin C to prevent scurvy. It’s seeds can be ground into a flour and baked, boiled whole, or rolled like oats (it’s a close relative to amaranth). And it grows everywhere. I took a cooler full to my very first farmer’s market, on May 4th 2002 at Big City Bread. Everyone, the other growers and the customers alike, wondered why the new guy was trying to sell a weed. I gave a lot away that day, but must have convinced enough people, because in future weeks I had trouble bringing in enough to meet the demand. There are several growers this week listing lamb’s quarters at Athens Locally Grown this week, so if you’ve missed your spring spinach in this heat, give them a try!

There are plenty of other natives that don’t get their due. The fruit of the passion flower, known around here as a “may pop”, are starting to ripen. These little guys look like limes, and grow on a low vine with the most beautiful purple flowers. There are some growing and flowering right now at the courtyard at Farm 255 downtown. They easily open up to reveal individual seed clusters, kind of like a pomegranate. You can suck on the little fruitlets and get a nice sweet citrusy treat. Like real citrus, it’s rich in vitamin C, but it grows right here. Another good source of vitamin C is sumac berries, which are just now turning red. These can be used to make a pink “lemonade”, or ground and used as a tangy meat rub.

These native foods are hard to come by unless you know what you’re looking for, but keep your eyes open! You’ll see them now and again both here and at the other farmers markets.

We’ve re-instated our regular “Meet the Grower” table during the Thursday pickups. This Thursday, David Hoechst, owner of Dragonfly Farm, will be back at the table. He took a turn just a few weeks ago, but it ready to share more with you, especially his heirloom tomatoes. While you’re waiting for us to fill your order, step up to her table and say hi!

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: July 11, Sunday, at Veribest Farm (Oglethorpe County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are pleased and grateful to find ourselves with enough of a patch of soil to participate in Athens Locally Grown and believe in the philosophy of thinking globally and eating locally. We believe in and strive for a sustainable lifestyle that includes growing fine vegetables produced without chemicals while conserving resources. This farm is approximately 33 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 50 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for June 24


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Calabacitas

This recipe is one of my favorite traditional New Mexican dishes, another I adapted from a restaurant menu. On more than one occasion my friends and I biked a dozen miles across the desert to eat lunch at The Coyote Moon in Lemitar. We told ourselves it was for the great green chile cheeseburgers, but those burgers just wouldn’t have been the same without a side of calabacitas. It can be eaten as is for a side dish, but it also makes a great filling for vegetable tacos or burritos.

Serves 4

1 Tbsp. olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 pound zucchini (or yellow squash), cut into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
3/4 cup chopped heirloom tomato
1 diced hot pepper (optional)
1 cup corn kernels

In a large skillet, heat oil on medium heat until hot. Add onion and garlic and cook for three minutes, stirring. Add zucchini and cook three minutes, stirring. Add tomato, pepper, and corn and cook for four minutes, stirring. Serve.

To make a wonderful breakfast, crumble and brown 1 pound sausage. Add sausage and calabacitas to a casserole dish. Sprinkle with 1 cup shredded cheese. Pour two or three beaten eggs over the top of everything. Top with ½ cup bread crumbs and salt & pepper and bake at 325 until bubbly, about 25 minutes.

Market News

This heat has really been something. Every year I seem to get a little less tolerant of it (not a good trait for a veggie grower in the South, I admit), and it seems to have arrived far too early this year. I just took a moment to look back at my records, though, and maybe I’m wrong. Seems to be too much, too soon, either way. We even have okra listed on the website this week, and this has to be the earliest we’ve ever had okra for sale.

So, the Spring greens have just about had it until fall. The tougher cooking greens (made tender via low and slow braising) are plentiful, and the summer crops are all coming quickly. Eggplant has returned, winter squash have come in (so named because they can keep through the winter, but there’s no reason to wait until then to start eating them), and the beans are growing backs just about as fast as they can be picked. I can’t go out to my garden these days without tripping over a five foot long zucchini.

And you know what? I actually prefer them that size. Modern squash varieties, the kind you find in the grocery store, are bred for growing quickly and standing up to shipping stress. That results in a tasteless spongy flesh that has to be eaten when small to get any flavor at all. I’ve noticed just the opposite with many heirloom varieties, however. The Costata Romanesco zucchini I grow develop a fantastic nutty flavor that only gets better the larger they grow. The old Delaware Indian crookneck yellow squash, the kind with the sharp warts, also gets a wonderful complex flavor as it grows. Yes, the area right around the seeds gets spongy and I scoop that out, but the rest of it is fantastic. There is a reason that people have bred them into so many shapes and colors throughout the ages, and it’s not to eat them all when they’re tiny.

Anyway, there is well over a thousand items from our growers available for you to purchase this week. We’ve got some pretty big and fancy grocery stores in Athens, but I can’t think of a single one that can match our variety of fresh food. It really is a testament to all of the hard work our growers have done in the last ten years (many of them for less than that), transforming our landscape both literally and figuratively.

We’ve re-instated our regular “Meet the Grower” table during the Thursday pickups. This Thursday, you’ll get to meet Summer Cordell, owner of Goodness Gracious! Granola. Her profile has this to say: “I started our local granola company in Atlanta, the spring of 2008, and moved the kitchen to Suwanee in 2009. We use local honey, Georgia sorghum, as well as other natural and organic ingredients. This year we began using safflower and/or coconut oil instead of canola.The flavors are amazing. Our granolas are 60-80% organic, no preservatives, no refined sugars, no salt. We also flavorfully roast cinnamon almonds, rosemary pecans and lime-spice cashews, and on occasion, have made the best almond coffee toffee available! We are currently changing our packaging to a compostable package made from recycled material.” While you’re waiting for us to fill your order, step up to her table and say hi!

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: July 11, Sunday, at Veribest Farm (Oglethorpe County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are pleased and grateful to find ourselves with enough of a patch of soil to participate in Athens Locally Grown and believe in the philosophy of thinking globally and eating locally. We believe in and strive for a sustainable lifestyle that includes growing fine vegetables produced without chemicals while conserving resources. This farm is approximately 33 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 50 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for June 17


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Chanterelles in the Oven

Easily prepared, this can be served as a side dish with baked chicken, a roast, or grilled fish. It can also be used as a sauce for pasta or rice. From the Mycological Society of San Francisco.
Serves 4

1 pound chanterelles, cut in halves or quarters
1 onion, chopped
1/4 cup rich chicken broth
1/2 cup heavy cream
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley

Arrange the chanterelles in a buttered casserole dish. Cover with the chopped onion. Cover the dish and bake in a preheated 350º oven for 20 minutes. Remove the cover, add the broth and cream, and continue to bake without the cover for another 15 minutes. Do not allow the cream to boil. Adjust the flavor by adding salt and pepper. Serve with the parsley sprinkled on top.

Market News

It’s the last week of spring, but both the weather and the availability list feels like the middle of summer. I see a lot of new and returning favorites on the list this week, including chanterelle mushrooms, sweet corn, beans of all sorts, many types of squash, and loads of tomatoes. And much,much more, of course: there are over 1000 items listed this week! The new products carousel is full of goodies, but also keep in mind that it only shows items added to the market for the first time. Some of our growers have been selling through ALG for nine years now, and they’ve got plenty of returning favorites that won’t appear in the carousel.

This morning about 30 of us went over to Sundance Farm for our June “Farmer for a Day” event. We harvested about 300 pounds of onions, weeded the rows they were in, moved irrigation lines around, and then planted that space (several hundred feet) with watermelons. We did all that in about 100 minutes, saving the Janosik family countless hours of work. We then had lunch on their lovely porch, with sandwiches from Daily Grocery, several salads the Janosiks made, and a selection of breads including a fantastic freshly made zucchini bread. After lunch, Ed led us on a walk of the entire farm, explaining what they were growing along with the hows and whys. It was a lovely day, even with the heat. If you’ve never been to one of our “Farmer for a Day” events, please consider coming. We have several more scheduled for the rest of the summer, starting with Veribest Farm on July 11th. Admission is free and includes lunch. Space is limited, though, so you do need to make reservations. Take a look in the “Event Reservations” category on the Market page of the website.

We’ve also re-instated our regular “Meet the Grower” table during the Thursday pickups. This Thursday, you’ll get to meet David Hoechst, owner of Dragonfly Farm. Their farm profile has this to say: “We have been growing organic produce for ourselves and family for 25 years. While a small operation, we have too much for just us. We’d like to share our bounty with more like minded people in the community.Everything we grow is something we enjoy and have found through the years to be good quality. We enjoy growing a variety of things including cucumbers, tomatoes, cabbage, watermelon, cantaloupe, squash, corn, okra, berries, flowers, and now have over 400 different daylilies.” While you’re waiting for us to fill your order, step up to his table and say hi!

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: July 11, Sunday, at Veribest Farm (Oglethorpe County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are pleased and grateful to find ourselves with enough of a patch of soil to participate in Athens Locally Grown and believe in the philosophy of thinking globally and eating locally. We believe in and strive for a sustainable lifestyle that includes growing fine vegetables produced without chemicals while conserving resources. This farm is approximately 33 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 50 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for June 10


I generally spend an hour or so late Sunday evening looking through the Athens Locally Grown product listings, making a note of what’s new this week, finding some recipes that use those ingredients, and choosing one of those to share with you in my newsletter. Along the way, I make a few notes and then quickly type all that out into what I hope is a nice newslettery mailing for you that really just serves as the opening bell for market for the week.

I didn’t do that this week, though. We just had a heck of a thunderstorm move overhead, and I spent my hour with everything unplugged, sitting on the porch watching the lightning and listening to the thunder and the rain pouring on the tin roof. It’s come and gone, and I suppose I could pick up where I left off, but why not just open the market instead? There’s no sense keeping all of us up late, just so you can have one more recipe for squash, is there?

Tell you what… here’s one of my standbys. Right after I graduated college, a coffee shop opened up town. Besides the usual coffee shop drinks, Martha’s Black Dog served up a few simple but beautifully prepared dishes, and the place quickly became a favorite place to eat. This recipe for Steamed Eggs and Squash is one of her dishes that is still in my rotation today. It’s a great way to use up the overflowing basket of squash and zucchini, along with those eggs that are finally plentiful. Add a side of sauteed green beans and some crunchy toast, and you’ve got a fine meal suitable for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. And made 100% with items found through Athens Locally Grown (expect the olive oil, but I’m working on that).

1 zucchini and/or summer squash, cubed
5 eggs, beaten
½ cup soft cheese (cottage, fromage blanc, chevre, etc.)
salt and pepper

Sauté the squash in a tiny bit of olive oil until just heated through. Set up a double boiler (two nested sauce pans with an inch of water in the bottom will be fine). When the water comes to a boil, add the eggs, cottage cheese, and seasonings. Slowly stir constantly. When the eggs have just begun to set, add the squash. Cook a little bit less than you like them as they’ll finish cooking on the plate.

Some quick news: Our next Farmer for a Day event, on Sunday June 13, at Sundance Farm, has filled up. There are slots still available for our July, August, and September Farmer for a Day events, and you can find more details on the Market page of the website, under the Event Reservations category.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Thank you for all of your support of Athens Locally Grown and our member growers. Without your patronage and demand for locally grown and naturally grown foods, the growers wouldn’t be here to meet that demand, and our entire community would be much worse off. Thank you! We’ll see you on Thursday from 4:30 to 8pm at Ben’s Bikes, at the corner of Pope and Broad!

Availability for June 3


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Crushed Heirloom Potatoes

As with tomatoes, the profusion of heirloom varieties of potatoes at farmers’ markets has helped us rediscover them as a seasonal ingredient in a rainbow of flavors, colors, and textures. This recipe is the perfect vehicle for trying any number of them. Nutty, creamy La Ratte fingerlings are a favorite of French chefs. German Butterballs, as their name suggests, are soft and buttery. For even cooking, choose potatoes that are about the same size. From Bon Appetit, January 2005.
Serves 6 to 8

2 pounds unpeeled whole heirloom potatoes
3 ounces crumbled gorgonzola or blue cheese
1/2 cup pecans, toasted, chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups (packed) baby arugula

Place potatoes in large pot. Pour enough cold water over to cover; salt generously. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until potatoes are just tender, 20 to 40 minutes (depending on variety). Drain. Return potatoes to pot. Using large wooden spoon, coarsely crush potatoes in pot. Add cheese, nuts, and oil. Stir in arugula and toss to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl and serve.

Market News

Those of you who ordered last week got to see a number of changes to our order checkout system. Everything seemed to go really smoothly, wait times were cut way down, and there were a marked reduction in items that got lost and needed to be refunded back to you. I thought we might need a few weeks to get used to it all ourselves, but things just worked right off. If you missed it, here’s a summary of what’s new:

  • We built an awning, and now (in good weather) both order pickup and payments all take place outside under the awning
  • We’ve taken advantage of the new space inside to spread out more and arrange the grower’s items more effectively
  • We chipped in for internet access at the building, and can now access orders on the website from a variety of devices
  • We have two payment stations, each with an iPad looking at the website, who can take payments and mark items as missing or needing a refund right on the spot

I built a whole order checkout (and grower check in) system that lets us save nearly 200 pages a week that we had previously been printing. If we can get a grant or other funding for another 6 to 8 iPads, then the volunteers packing your orders can also use the checkout system so that the pay station will know in real time what’s in your basket and know exactly how much is due. We’ll be able to stop printing out individual invoices, saving us another 350 pages a week. It’ll take us a while to get to that point, probably, but where we are now is much better than where we were at even a month ago. And even better, all of the work I’ve put in to improving order processing is instantly available to all of the other 200 or so Locally Grown markets around the country. That makes managing the markets that much easier, and will help our little model spread further. And that puts more locally grown food on more plates across the continent, and that is good for everyone involved.

We’ll also be re-instating our regular “Meet the Grower” table starting this week. This Thursday, you’ll get to meet Linda Johnson, owner of the Sylvan Falls Mill in Rabun Gap. Linda has sought out locally grown grains, especially the old-timey varieties, for use at her mill. That encourages those growers and shows others still that there is a market for small scale grain production, something that was once common here but has nearly been lost. You’ll get to learn about the mill, try some samples, and get a better idea of how important the secondary food producers like her are to our local food system. We’ll have other growers on hand for you to meet most weeks through the summer.

Many of you have asked about the status of the raw milk lawsuit. The wheels of justice turn slowly, and it’s all still in the courts, in the early stages. There has been some related news, though. LD Peeler, owner of Milky Way Dairy (one of the dairies who sold through us until last October), recently received a warning letter from the FDA accusing him of “causing to be delivered, selling, or otherwise distributing raw milk, in final package form for human consumption, in interstate commerce” all because some folks from Augusta were driving to his farm to buy milk. They seem to be telling him that he needs to verify that all of his customers are South Carolina residents, but LD says “I can’t determine where they’re from and I’m not going to.” I’ve got milk from LD’s cows in my refrigerator right now. The FDA thinks I’m committing a crime by driving to Milky Way farm (right up the highway and across a bridge from my house), buying milk in a manner that is legal for everyone in South Carolina, and then bringing it back to my home. The FDA has been to my house and seized my milk without a warrant before, but I guess they don’t want to put inspectors on all the bridges to stop everyone doing this, so they’re telling LD that he has to act as policeman. One of the aims of our lawsuit is to put an end to this madness. You can learn more about the letter, and LD’s reaction, at the excellent weblog on raw milk matters The Complete Patient.

We’ll go out on that note. While you’re remembering all of the fallen soldiers who have given everything to protect the freedoms we have, also remember that those rights are always under threat. It hasn’t yet come to government inspectors searching cars as they leave a farm, but the FDA has testified in court that they have the right to do so, and that we do not have the right to any particular food. Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: JUNE 13, Sunday, at Sundance Farm (Madison County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are a family farm growing a diverse variety of vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits and berries. We also raise chickens, heritage turkeys and goats. Our three children are the heart of our farm. They enjoy the healthy food they help harvest and realize what it takes to get from a seed to the table. We are Certified Naturally Grown and have sold produce in the Athens area since 1998. Currently we sell at Athens Locally Grown, Athens Farmers Market, local restaurants and from the farm. We are also planning a C.S.A. in the near future. We appreciate all the Locally Grown customers that have supported us through the years, allowing us to do what we love, Growing good food. This farm is approximately 13 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 20 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for May 27


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Coleslaw with Cilantro and Chives

There is almost nothing better to do with a young, fresh head of cabbage than to make it into a fluffy slaw. It’s refreshing on a hot summer’s day and pairs nicely with all kinds of fresh raw vegetables. Here we simply accent the cabbage with cilantro and chives, but you can add julienned carrots, bell peppers, celery, or whatever crunchy fresh vegetable you like. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables.
Serves 8 to 10

4 to 6 cups shredded cabbage (green, red, or a combination) (2 to 3 small heads)
1/4 cup minced cilantro
1/4 cup chopped chives
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt

1. Toss the cabbage, cilantro, and chives in a large bowl or container; refrigerate, covered, for at least 1 hour or overnight.
2. When ready to serve, mix the oil, vinegar, sugar, and salt in a small bowl until well combined. Pour the dressing over the chilled cabbage mixture. Mix well just before serving.

Market News

It’s an exciting week on the availability list, for quite a few reasons. The first might seem a bit mundane, but for me it means I no longer have to buy three staples at the grocery store (just about the only produce I’ve had to buy outside of Athens Locally Grown for months). I’m talking about potatoes, onion bulbs, and garlic. I’ve run out of fresh garlic quite a ways back, and I just haven’t gotten the hang of storing potatoes and onions through the winter, and I go through a lot of all three of them in my kitchen. The friendly produce man at Ingles will miss seeing me, I’m sure. Another things people have been asking about for years has also arrived for the first time this week: chicken packaged by cuts. If getting a whole chicken wasn’t your thing, you can now get packs of legs, thighs, wings, and breasts from Greendale Farm. Buying a whole bird is always cheaper, of course, but I know there have been several times when I wished I could get a pack of thighs for a certain recipe I’m fond of. Now, I can!

There are a number of other notable items to look for: a Gruyere cheese from Nature’s Harmony, a summer granola mix from Mertie’s Oven, more types of tomatoes, summer squash, lots of leeks, loads of basil, and more. We’re over 1000 items all told this week, more than you’ll find at any of the traditional farmers markets in the area. You’ve got a great opportunity to experiment with things you’ve never tried before, and to try many different varieties of something you already like, to find your favorite. All this variety is a great way to turn mealtime into more than just a way to get energy into your body, to make it an adventure. And kids enjoy taste tests! “I don’t like turnips” they may say, but then you might tell them “You’ve only had purple tops. Here is a Hakurei turnip from Japan that tastes completely different, and here is a Gold Ball from Scotland that is different again.” And the exploration begins!

Filling and organizing orders with our new shelving system went really smoothly last week. The volunteers are able to spread things out and find what they need much faster than before. The growers are still getting used to it, but they seem to like the extra space too. So, this week we’ll change things even more by moving the pickup tables and the pay stations outside. Yesterday, Roseanne Hutchinson, Tom Reynolds, and I built a large awning attached to the wall of the building. It’s 40 feet by 18 feet, and gives us more room for you than you had inside. We plan on having two pay stations too, to make payment go faster for us all. So, you can hang round and socialize as long as you want to without feeling like you’re holding up the flow, and we can spread things out inside even more. Of course, if you want to come on in and take a look at things, feel free! If it storms on a Thursday, we can move us all back inside, but when it’s nice… plenty of room! This will also allow us to more easily plan social events during the Thursday pickups, like regular “Meet the Grower” tables, music, hosting the Farm 255 farm cart, and so on.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: JUNE 13, Sunday, at Sundance Farm (Madison County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are a family farm growing a diverse variety of vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits and berries. We also raise chickens, heritage turkeys and goats. Our three children are the heart of our farm. They enjoy the healthy food they help harvest and realize what it takes to get from a seed to the table. We are Certified Naturally Grown and have sold produce in the Athens area since 1998. Currently we sell at Athens Locally Grown, Athens Farmers Market, local restaurants and from the farm. We are also planning a C.S.A. in the near future. We appreciate all the Locally Grown customers that have supported us through the years, allowing us to do what we love, Growing good food. This farm is approximately 13 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 20 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for May 20


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Rhubarb-Strawberry Jam

Rhubarb is really hard to come by down here, but my local grocer had some grown in North Carolina on the shelf today, so my Yankee cravings for homemade strawberry-rhubarb jam (using strawberries from Athens Locally GRown, of course) was satisfied today. From http://www.rhubarbinfo.com.

1 qt Fresh strawberries
6 1/2 c Sugar
1 lb Rhubarb
1 Pouch liquid pectin
1/4 c Water

1. Remove caps from strawberries. Crush berries, one layer at a time. Trim (do not peel) rhubarb. Thinly slice or chop stalks. Add water. Cover and simmer 2 minutes or until soft. Add to the prepared strawberries.
2. Measure 3 1/2 cup of prepared fruit. If it measures slightly less, add water. Place measured fruit in a 6 or 8- quart saucepan.
3. Measure sugar exactly and set aside. Open liquid pectin and set the pouch upright in a cup.
4. Stir sugar into prepared fruit. The saucepan must be no more than one-third full to allow for a full rolling boil.
5. Bring to a full rolling boil over high heat. Boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.
6. Stir in pectin at once. Quickly skim off foam with a large metal spoon. Immediately ladle into hot jars, leaving 1/4- inch space at top. With a damp cloth, wipe jar rims and threads clean.
7. Immediately cover jars with hot canning lids. Screw bands on firmly.
8. Place jars in a boiling water bath, carefully setting jars on rack in canner of boiling water. Cover canner and return water to a boil; boil 5 minutes.
9. Remove jars from canner and let cool. Check seals and store in a cool, dry place.

Market News

As you probably noticed when you picked up your order last Thursday, we’re revamping our process organizing the produce and fulfilling orders. I emptied the bank account and got many, many shelving units that set up quickly and dear down and stack neatly. When arranged in aisles, the four levels give us about double the capacity we had with the stacked cot system we had been using. We can write right on the edge of the shelves with wet erase markers, so that should make it easier to more quickly find what we’re looking for when we’re gathering your ordered items. We did a limited experiment with the system two weeks ago, and dove right in last week. We right away found a few improvements (my apologies to those who arrived right at 4:30 and had to wait a bit longer than usual), and this coming week things out to run smoothly. We already packed a heck of a lot of food into that little room, and now we can fit in about twice as much.

There will be some more changes to come in the next few weeks. The first parts of the awning arrived this week, and the rest should get here in a few days. We’ll be putting it up on Saturday (assuming everything does indeed arrive). It should be a pretty easy task, but more hands is always nice. If you’d like to help, let me know and I’ll be contacting you with the details. Once that is up, we plan on having everything for you outside under the awning when the weather’s nice. It’s 18 feet by 40 feet, so there will be plenty of room, and you should be more comfortable than cramming into the little space we currently have. The tables to pick up your order and the pay station will all be moved outside.

We’ll also be opening up a second pay station, and that will clear that bottleneck. When there are eight of us filling orders, the payment line can get a bit backed up. I’ve gotten my hands on two iPads, and have been building a system so that the two people taking payments can use them to look up your order, mark it as paid, and even adjust your order right in the system for things that didn’t arrive. We’ll also be able to then start accepting payment via credit or debit cards, something many of you have been asking for. Many great improvements, I think, are coming very soon!

We had our first “Farmer for a Day” event on Saturday, hosted by Darby Farm. We helped them clear scrub and brush from overgrown pasture that will soon be forage area for turkeys and chickens. After a nice lunch, we then got to hear and see Daniel Dover’s approach to providing clean, humane poultry to us with very little operating capital and overhead. A conventional poultry person will tell you you need a quarter million dollar loan just to build a single chicken house, and then you’re beholden to a poultry company like Pilgrim’s Pride to provide you with feed, birds, and everything else on their terms. Darby Farms started with none of that, and disproves the notion that it’s just too expensive to get into farming. Our next Farmer for a Day event is Sunday June 13th at Sundance Farm. Spots are still open, so make your reservations soon!

We’ll be having some other neat demonstrations at the Locally GRown pickup point this Thursday. Evan McGown, founder and director of the Institute for Wild Intelligence here in Athens will be on hand to demonstrate some primitive skills, such as fire by friction, that children especially will enjoy. Evan also runs several nature-based summer camps, and will have information on hand about those. You can learn more about Evan and Wild Intelligence at his website: http://www.wildintelligence.org/.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: JUNE 13, Sunday, at Sundance Farm (Madison County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are a family farm growing a diverse variety of vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits and berries. We also raise chickens, heritage turkeys and goats. Our three children are the heart of our farm. They enjoy the healthy food they help harvest and realize what it takes to get from a seed to the table. We are Certified Naturally Grown and have sold produce in the Athens area since 1998. Currently we sell at Athens Locally Grown, Athens Farmers Market, local restaurants and from the farm. We are also planning a C.S.A. in the near future. We appreciate all the Locally Grown customers that have supported us through the years, allowing us to do what we love, Growing good food. This farm is approximately 13 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 20 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for May 13


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Sauteed Sugar Snap Peas with Carrots and Honey Glaze

The fresh, summery flavor of sugar snap peas is set off by the sweetness of lightly cooked carrots and a honey glaze. Sweet simplicity. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables.

Serves 4

1/2–1 pound sugar snap peas
2 medium carrots, peeled
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon honey
freshly ground black pepper

1. Remove the strings from both edges of the pea pods.
2. Cut each carrot into thirds. Slice each third, lengthwise, into quarters so that the slices are about the size and shape of the sugar snap peas.
3. Place the carrots in a steamer basket set over 1 1/2 inches boiling water, cover, and steam until they are just crisp-tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain the carrots in a colander.
4. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sugar snap peas; cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. Add the carrots. Continue to cook and stir until the peas are bright green and crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Add the honey and cook for 1 more minute, stirring constantly, until the peas and carrots are thoroughly glazed with the honey.
5. Remove the skillet from heat. Season generously with pepper.

Market News

For the last six months, Athens Locally Grown has pretty much been the only game in town for buying locally grown foods. That changed in a hurry this week, as the traditional farmers markets have opened in Athens (Saturday mornings at Bishop Park and starting this Tuesday afternoon downtown at Little Kings Shuffle Club), Watkinsville (Saturday mornings downtown), and Comer (Saturday mornings downtown). And likely other neighboring towns I don’t know about. Many of the Athens Locally Grown growers sell only through here, but the others sell at one or several of these other markets. It’s hard to predict what effect that will have on availability, but I expect at least for these first few weeks some of the larger growers will hold back from here to be sure they have enough produce to make their presence worthwhile at the other markets. As the season progresses and the gardens are all producing more (and the growers themselves find their balance), things will even out again. I think Athens Locally Grown will continue to have the most variety, and is the most convenient way to shop for them, but please also frequent the other markets when you can. They do offer an atmosphere that I just can’t reproduce with our system, and especially do a great job of putting the sense of community front and center.

It’s sometimes hard to remember how deep the Athens local food community is when you’re just looking at a website and running in and out to pick up your order for the week. We try to show that more through our “meet the grower” tables (which will be starting up again soon) and our monthly farm tours and “farmer for a day” events. We’re very lucky to be at Ben’s Bikes, which seems to be an emerging center for the local food community. There is a new permaculture group that has starting meeting every Monday evening at 6pm right there where we have our weekly pickup. The meetings are potluck, so bring a dish, meet likeminded folks, and enjoy the evening. They’ve begun building a community garden right behind the shop, along the creek that was, until recently, completely overrun with kudzu. They’re calling it “The People’s Perennial Peace Garden at Tanyard Creek”, and they’re off to fantastic start. Just up the hillside, on the other side of the church there, is a neighborhood garden that even Sam Gamgee would be proud of. Two years ago, that area was also just a kudzu pile, and now it’s one of the most beautiful vegetable gardens I’ve seen. If you’ve got a few minutes when you come pick up your order, walk or drive right up the hill and take a look. It’s quite an inspiration for what could be done at neighborhoods all across town: neighbors banding together to create a thing of beauty that also gives them a fair measure of food independence.

Also there at Ben’s Bikes, in the part of the building opposite where we meet, folks are busy building a community kitchen. I’m not clear on the details, but the vision is to offer a communal space where people can come in and cook for a group, bring in produce from their gardens to cook and share, and so forth. It’s not a commercial space, so you couldn’t come in and, say, cook up a batch of jam to sell. I’m looking forward to learning more and seeing it all come together.

People have been asking me about the milk lawsuit. To recap the story so far, in October the state of Georgia, acting under orders from the FDA, seized a truckload of milk ALG customers had purchased from a dairy in South Carolina. They ordered the milk to remain on my truck, and then on Monday came out to my house and ordered it all dumped on the ground. Through the Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund, we have filed suit against the FDA, arguing on several grounds that they did not have the legal authority to seize and destroy an individual’s legally purchased milk simply because it had crossed state lines after it was purchased. The suit was filed a couple months ago, and the FDA had 60 days to respond. They have done so, and you may be surprised to learn that they claim you have “no absolute right to any particular food”, nor do you have a right to “bodily and physical health”. Their words. You can find a great analysis of their response here at The Complete Patient weblog. We have a further 60 days to respond, and the lawyers are already drawing that up. One thing the FDA claims in their response is “the government has neither brought nor threatened to bring a single enforcement action against consumers who purchase unpasteurized milk for personal consumption.” If they’re saying that, I can’t imagine what they think called it when an FDA agent came to my house, and in front of cameras ordered under the authority of her badge that 110 gallons of privately owned milk, purchased by ALG customers (including myself) for personal consumption, be destroyed. I’d call that an enforcement action, but what do I know? Anyway, I’ll let you know as things develop. It’s a slow process, but I’m hopeful we will prevail.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: MAY 15, Saturday, at Darby Farms (Walton County)

Certified Naturally Grown. Darby Farms is a family owned pasture-based, beyond organic, local-market farm and informational outreach in Walton County. We produce: pastured poultry (eggs, chicken, turkeys, ducks and guinea fowl) and will soon be offering pastured pork. We are in the redemption business: healing the land, healing the food, healing the economy, and healing the culture. Experience the satisfaction of knowing your food and your farmer and building community. We are your clean meat connection. This farm is approximately 27 miles from Athens and it’ll take about 40 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

Farmer for a Day: JUNE 13, Sunday, at Sundance Farm (Madison County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are a family farm growing a diverse variety of vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits and berries. We also raise chickens, heritage turkeys and goats. Our three children are the heart of our farm. They enjoy the healthy food they help harvest and realize what it takes to get from a seed to the table. We are Certified Naturally Grown and have sold produce in the Athens area since 1998. Currently we sell at Athens Locally Grown, Athens Farmers Market, local restaurants and from the farm. We are also planning a C.S.A. in the near future. We appreciate all the Locally Grown customers that have supported us through the years, allowing us to do what we love, Growing good food. This farm is approximately 13 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 20 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at Bishop Park from 8am to noon and every Tuesday evening at Little Kings downtown. It’s a totally separate entity from Athens Locally Grown, but you’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!

Availability for May 6


To Contact Us

Our Website: http://athens.locallygrown.net
On Twitter: @athlocallygrown
On Facebook: http://facebook.com/athenslocallygrown

Recipes

Roasted Radicchio with Gorgonzola and Balsamic Vinegar

Roasting brings out a concentrated, natural sweetness in radicchio. This dish is unusual, elegant, simple—and delicious. Served on a bed of risotto, it makes an attractive meal. If you’re not a Gorgonzola fan, this is equally delicious with Brie, Swiss, aged Cheddar, or smoked Gouda. You can substitute lemon juice for the balsamic vinegar. From Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt On Vegetables.

Serves 4

1 medium head radicchio, cut into 2-inch wedges
1/4 cup olive oil
salt
freshly ground black pepper
balsamic vinegar
4–6 ounces Gorgonzola (or other cheese), sliced

1. Preheat the oven to 400° F. Lightly oil a 2-quart baking dish.
2. Using a pastry brush, brush the radicchio generously with olive oil and place in a single layer in the baking dish. Season with salt and pepper.
3. Bake the radicchio for 20 minutes, turning wedges over once midway through cooking. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar and top with cheese. Return to the oven until cheese is melted, about 5 minutes.

Market News

Wow, it’s gotten late in a hurry tonight, so I’ll make this short.

When you arrive at Ben’s Bikes this week, be sure to take a look at our brand new mural painted on the outside of the building. The bike folks have a giant mural over on the half of the wall where their store’s entrance is, and a couple weeks ago they offered to let us paint a mural on the other half. We’re planning on putting up a large awning soon, so we had to move fast. I came up with a design that tried to match the style of the existing mural. Thanks to Rachel Parnell for helping me with the design. On Saturday, several of us gathered at BEn’s Bikes and spent the day up on ladders painting. Many thanks to Kim Morris, Kacy Welsh, Edwyna Arey, and Tom Reynolds for help! I think it came out just great. When we put the awning up, hopefully in this next week, it will go at “ground level” across the mural, so that the root veggies will stick down below. What do you think?

There are several events coming up you ought to be aware of. First, the Athens Farmers Market opens their season this Saturday, May 8th, at Bishop Park. Many of the same growers who sell through Athens Locally Grown also sell there, so you’ll see some familiar names. For more information (and for details on their Tuesday market opening up on the 11th downtown) visit their website, http://athensfarmersmarket.net/.

Fancy Feather Farms in Bowman is having an open house on Saturday. Visitors can see the emus and ostriches, along with many other activities. Details are on their website, http://www.fancyfeatherfarms.com.

Also Saturday, Split Creek Farm in Anderson, SC, is having their spring festival on Saturday. It’s the height of kidding season, and there is plenty to see at their farm. I attended this event by chance a few years ago, and was so impressed with what I saw I asked if they could begin selling through Athens Locally Grown so that you all could also benefit from their labors of love. You can find more detials about this event at their website, http://splitcreek.com.

I’d better stop there, as it’s nearly midnight.

Thanks so much for your support of Athens Locally Grown and everything we’ve tried to accomplish. With you’re help, we’ve been able to build something truly great and inspirational to people all across the country, more than you could know. Thank you also for your support of all of our growers, local food, and our rights to eat it. You all are part of what makes Athens such a great area in which to live. We’ll see you on Thursday at Ben’s Bikes at the corner of Pope and Broad Streets from 4:30 to 8pm!

Coming Events

Farmer for a Day: MAY 15, Saturday, at Darby Farms (Walton County)

Certified Naturally Grown. Darby Farms is a family owned pasture-based, beyond organic, local-market farm and informational outreach in Walton County. We produce: pastured poultry (eggs, chicken, turkeys, ducks and guinea fowl) and will soon be offering pastured pork. We are in the redemption business: healing the land, healing the food, healing the economy, and healing the culture. Experience the satisfaction of knowing your food and your farmer and building community. We are your clean meat connection. This farm is approximately 27 miles from Athens and it’ll take about 40 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

Farmer for a Day: JUNE 13, Sunday, at Sundance Farm (Madison County)

Certified Naturally Grown. We are a family farm growing a diverse variety of vegetables, herbs, flowers, fruits and berries. We also raise chickens, heritage turkeys and goats. Our three children are the heart of our farm. They enjoy the healthy food they help harvest and realize what it takes to get from a seed to the table. We are Certified Naturally Grown and have sold produce in the Athens area since 1998. Currently we sell at Athens Locally Grown, Athens Farmers Market, local restaurants and from the farm. We are also planning a C.S.A. in the near future. We appreciate all the Locally Grown customers that have supported us through the years, allowing us to do what we love, Growing good food. This farm is approximately 13 miles from Athens, and it’ll take 20 minutes to get there. Space is limited, so please make reservations by adding them to your order. You’ll find it under the “Events Reservations” category on the website.

The Athens Farmers Market is closed for the winter. They’ll be opening back up for the season on May 8th. You can watch for news during the offseason on their website. The other area markets are also getting ready to open again. When I hear about their opening dates, I’ll let you know.

Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!